Frequently Asked Questions ~ Test & Tag

Test & Tag FAQ Expanded (with answers from SafeWorkSA regulations and OH&S Legislation)

Why test & tag your workplace appliances?

Test and Tag your electrical appliances and it will remove electrical shock hazards and also reduce further risk.

Refer to:  SafeWork SA citing: Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations

The OHSW Act and OHSW Regulations place a duty of care on employers and employees to ensure  safety in the workplace.   The Regulations use the principle of hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control to minimise the risk of injury in the workplace. The focus of this legislation is on the equipment that is plugged into power points. There are also specific requirements in the Regulations for the use and testing of RCDs in the workplace.

Regulation 2.5.7 (1) Regular inspection and testing must be performed on electrical plant in the workplace if the supply of electricity is through a socket outlet to –

(a) hand held electrical plant; or

(b) electrical plant that is moved while

in operation; or

(c) electrical plant that is moved

between operations in

circumstances where damage to the

electrical plant or to a flexible

supply cord could reasonably occur;

or

(d) electrical plant where electrical

safety could be affected by the

operating environment.

(2) If electrical plant is fixed, it must be

inspected and tested after taking into

account –

(a) information provided by the

designer or manufacturer of the

electrical plant; and

(b) any hazard identification and risk

assessment process that is relevant

to the use of the electrical plant in

its intended work environment.

Inspection and testing of electrical

plant.

What are the Risks?

Failure to protect employees and the general public from electrical hazards will cause harm to them physically and will leave your organisation open to legal action. On top of this your public indemnity insurance may become invalid or at least it could have a material effect on your claim. Non-compliance may also affect your Work-Safe SA obligations, fire and other insurance claims.

Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations SA:

Hazard identification and risk assessment Regulation 1.3.2 (1)

An employer

must, in relation to the implementation

of these regulations, ensure that

appropriate steps are taken to identify

all reasonably foreseeable hazards

arising from work which may affect the

health or safety of employees or other

persons at the workplace.

(2) If a hazard is identified under

subregulation (1), an employer must

ensure that an assessment is made of

the risks associated with the hazard.

(3) In carrying out an assessment under

subregulation (2), an employer must,

as far as is reasonably practicable,

determine a method of assessment

that adequately addresses the hazards

identified, and includes one, or a

combination of two or more, of the

following:

(a) a visual inspection; (b) auditing; (c) testing;  (d) technical or scientific evaluation; (e) an analysis of injury and near-miss data; (f) discussions with designers, manufacturers, suppliers, importers, employers, employees or other relevant parties; (g) a quantitative hazard analysis.

(4) Without limiting the operation of

subregulations (1) and (2), the

identification of hazards and the

assessment of associated risks must be

undertaken-

(a) before the introduction of any plant

or substance;

(b) before the introduction of a work

practice or procedure;

(c) before changing the workplace, a

work or work practice, or an activity

or process, where to do so may give

rise to a risk to health or safety.

What do I need to do to Comply?

By law all businesses must comply with current safety standards, and the simplest way is to have your electrical appliances professionally tested & tagged. The standard AS/NZ 3760:2003, forms the basis of testing, identifying & removing of electrical hazards as required by Work Safe SA.

Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations SA:

Inspection and testing of electrical plant Regulation 2.5.7 (1)

Regular

inspection and testing must be

performed on electrical plant in the

workplace if the supply of electricity

is through a socket outlet to –

(a) hand held electrical plant; or

(b) electrical plant that is moved while

in operation; or

(c) electrical plant that is moved

between operations in

circumstances where damage to the

electrical plant or to a flexible

supply cord could reasonably occur;

or

(d) electrical plant where electrical

safety could be affected by the

operating environment.

(2) If electrical plant is fixed, it must be

inspected and tested after taking into

account –

(a) information provided by the

designer or manufacturer of the

electrical plant; and

(b) any hazard identification and risk

assessment process that is relevant

to the use of the electrical plant in

its intended work environment.

What do I need to test & tag?

An electrical equipment or appliance is an electricity consuming device or apparatus (including the cable) that is connected to or capable of being connected to the electrical installation.

By Definition Electrical Appliances are identified from the Standards AS/NZ 3760:2003 as follows:

Electrical appliances can be classified into one of the following categories,

  1. residual current device, RCD: a switching device intended to isolate the circuit when the current imbalance attains the rated operating leakage current value of the device;
  2. hand-held / portable: an appliance which is hand-held while in operation or can be moved easily while connected to the supply. Examples: floor polisher, vacuum cleaner, power tools (portable drill, grinder, soldering iron), extension lead, non-fixed electric portable outlet device (EPOD) or power board, jug, toaster, desk lamp, laboratory stirrer/heater, heat gun, heating mantle, etc;
  3. movable: an appliance that can be moved readily from one place to another by unplugging from a general purpose outlet, but that is not moved during operation. Examples: cathode ray oscilloscope, electronic balance, personal computer, printer, etc;
  4. fixed / stationary: an appliance which in normal use is fastened to a support of otherwise secured in a specific position or is of such size or function as to be difficult or unlikely to be moved from one place to another. Examples: large workshop machinery (lathe, band saw, etc.), oven, refrigerator, etc;
  5. experimental unique: an appliance constructed by the work area that does not fit into any of the other categories. Examples: immersion heater elements, furnaces, zone refiners, distillation control systems, UV light sources, heater controllers, etc.

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Here at Tested & True ~ test & tag all our Technicians are Trained to National Standard UEENEEP008 by Intertag in Sydney NSW, all our Equipment is in good repair and in Calibration. Most of all  we pride ourselves on our Knowledge of OH&S legislation and the current Australian  Standards ensuring that you get Quality Service at a competitive price.

Visit us at www.testedandtrue.com.au Peter Hill Manager, Tested & True ~ test & tag also visit our Newsletter at http://testedtruenewsletter.blogspot.com/ or call us NOW 0407 605568

Tested & True ~ test & tag Adelaide April 2010

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